The Oxford Handbook of Information and Communication Technologies

Unknown author

Catalogue Number: 5EA-7Z35

The Oxford Handbook of Information and Communication Technologies

  • Format: Paperback
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 9780199548798
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Synopsis

The production and consumption of Information and Communication Technologies (or ICTs) has become embedded within our societies. The influence and implications of this have an impact at a macro level, in the way our governments, economies, and businesses operate, and in our everyday lives. This handbook is about the many challenges presented by ICTs. It sets out an intellectual agenda that examines the implications of ICTs for individuals, organizations, democracy, and the economy. Explicity interdisciplinary, and combining empirical research with theoretical work, it is organised around four themes covering the knowledge economy; organizational dynamics, strategy, and design; governance and democracy; and culture, community and new media literacies. It provides a comprehensive resource for those working in the social sciences, and in the physical sciences and engineering fields, with leading contemporary research informed principally by the disciplines of anthropology, economics, philosophy, politics, and sociology.

Author's Biography

Roger Silverstone was Professor of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Previous publications include Media, Technology and Everyday Life in Europe (Ashgate, 2005) and Why Study the Media? (Sage, 1999).

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